Typical Case Studies of Companies Suffering from Marketing Myopia
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Typical Case Studies of Companies Suffering from Marketing Myopia

The number of case studies of companies suffering from marketing myopia has been increasing during the last decades, despite the fact that there is a considerable amount of scientific background and research on this subject. In this article you can find a list of the most popular case studes of marketing myopia.

The concept of marketing myopia has remained a favorite subject of academic discussion and analysis, from the time that Theodore Levitt publishes his famous paper on Harvard Business Review in 1960, untill nowadays. A great number of companies proved Levitt right in his approach, and they served as typical examples of marketing myopia cases. 

1. Electrolux Washing Machines

For those of you who think that environmental sustainability and ecology can motivate consumers to buy products, in the expense of other traditional marketing factors such as cost, service and convenience of use, you might want to change your mind after studying the case of Electrolux Washing Machines. Instead of consumers turning convenience-blind, Electrolux itself acquired a myopic, failing approach. 

2. Fairtrade Coffee

This is a characteristic case of marketing myopia, although this time it was the myopic perception of the suppliers’ interests, which initiated marketing failure. 

3. Green buildings construction

With the current need for wiser use of energy resources and the increasing dependence of consumers on the price fluctuations of fossil fuels, as well the subsequent effects on their incomes, it would only be natural for them to create a high level of demand for energy-efficient and energy-saving products. However, once more, consumers showed that they did not suffer from myopia, in the same way that green buildings construction companies did, and they did not base their purchasing decisions simply on environmental causes.

4. Philips Earthlight light bulb

This was Philips’ attempt, back in 1994, to lure consumers into buying a more energy-efficient bulb. The initial launch of the product was proved to be myopic, since it failed to take into consideration certain technical factors and the company did not market properly the product’s cost and money saving benefits to the consumers. In the end, a redesign of the bulb and stronger marketing promotion brought the required results. 

5. Whirlpool Energy Wise refrigerator

Despite state recognition and award funding, this energy-saving refrigerator did not meet the consumers’ money saving criteria, and they were not prepared to pay a difference in the price of the product, just for the sake of increased environmental awareness. This was again another case of wrong, myopic estimation of the real, existing needs of the market.

 6. Eastman Kodak

The former pioneer in research and development projects did not manage to follow the flow of the stream of technological innovation, due to its unwillingness to discard obsolete products and practices and move on to the next generation of production and marketing techniques in the film and photography industry. This special form of marketing myopia was defined by a reluctance or inability to assess correctly the course of events in the specific industry and unwillingness to observe competitors’ movements, as well as monitor broader developments in the economy and the society. 

Sources:

-Sustainability marketing myopia: Case studies

-Avoiding Green Marketing Myopia

-What went wrond at Eastman Kodak

-What is marketing myopia?

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Comments (6)

Good discussion here. I know most of these companies, FB liked.

interesting read

Phoenix and Jeanne, thank you both for your comments.

I am impressed with your research here..

Thank you P. Guims.

Good Job

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